Which Lamb is the Best: American, Australian or New Zealand?

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Lamb is a very subjective item. Many people feel that New Zealand or Australian is the best and others feel there is no lamb other than American and are willing to pay the premium price for it.
Lamb from each region has its own distinguishing characteristics including flavor, size and price. What are the differences then?

American Lamb:

American lamb is just that, it has been raised in the U.S. Most quality American lamb comes from Colorado and the Midwestern States and is grain fed. This breed is the largest in size and many say is the highest in quality and consistency.
American lamb has grain in its diet and thus tastes less “gamey” compared to imported lamb which is typically grass fed. It is also the most expensive available. American lamb is very sensitive to market conditions which makes availability and size variable. Lamb farming is a small industry in the U.S. which is why supply and demand is a major issue.

Australian Lamb:

“Aussie” lamb has become a very popular item today. It has been cross-bred with American lamb to create a larger more consistent product. Not too many years ago Aussie lamb was very undesirable. The lambs were raised primarily for their wool and the meat was almost a by-product of that industry. This meant a very inconsistent product in size and quality.

Today Aussie lamb is also raised for consumption to a specific size and weight which produces a quality product that is less expensive than American domestic lamb. It is of a medium size and resembles that of American lamb the most.

New Zealand Lamb:

New Zealand has long produced lamb for its wool industry. This breed is of small stature and many believe is of the least quality compared to American and Australian lamb. Consequently it is also the least expensive lamb. Many customers use this product because of its attractive cost and consistent sizing. When compared to American and Aussie lamb, the price is right.

Popular Lamb Cuts:

Lamb can be purchased a few different ways, “Primal”, “Sub-Primal” and “Portion Control”. Most customers purchase “Sub-Primal” or “Portion Control”. Unlike beef, when lamb is portioned, they become “Chops” not “Steaks”.

Popular Primal Cuts – Bone-In:

Leg, Loin, Hotel Rack, Shoulder, Saddle

Popular Sub Primal Cuts:

Rack Split Chine Off, Loin Boneless Trimmed, Leg Boneless, Shank, Shoulder Boneless

Popular Portion Control Cuts:

Lamb Rack, Frenched, Lamb Rib Chop, Frenched, Lamb Loin Chop, Lamb Shoulder Chops, Lamb Leg, Frenched Carving

So, which Lamb is the best: American, Australian or New Zealand? Perhaps all of them, depending on your specific needs. Try them and decide for yourself!

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The Caipirinha Is The Brazilian Cocktail You’ve Been Too Afraid To Pronounce

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It’s time to take a break from the mojito, put down the margarita, and give Brazil’s national cocktail ― the caipirinha ― a chance to star at your next cocktail hour. The caipirinha is a simple cocktail made of cachaça, lime and sugar, and it is as refreshing as it is potent.

We know this cocktail could take over happy hours nationwide if it weren’t for this one small flaw: it’s hard to pronounce. And since no one wants to look the fool at the bar, this drink doesn’t get ordered as often as it should. Don’t let this stop you from getting familiar with one of the best cocktails around. There’s a simple fix…

Say it with us now: Kai-Pee-Reen-Ya.

The caipirinha is a fun drink to mix. It involves muddling lime wedges with sugar ― yes, the wedges are left in the glass when served ― and topping it all off with ice and cachaça. But first, you’ll have to stock your home bar with Brazil’s favorite spirit, the previously mentioned cachaça.

Since we know you’re wondering, let’s tackle how to pronounce cachaça before we delve into what it is:

All together now: Ka-Shah-Suh.

Cachaça is a Brazilian distilled spirit made from the fermented juice of sugarcane. It has a flavor reminiscent of rum ― rum is also made from sugarcane ― but it is more vegetal and robust because it’s made from raw sugarcane (and not a byproduct, such as molasses, like rum is). Its production dates back to the 1500s when the Portuguese arrived in Brazil. Rum was distilled a couple hundred years later in other parts of the Americas. Just like with any spirit, its flavor can vary greatly depending on the quality of production. Industrial options can be rough, but delve into smaller batch productions and you’ll be well rewarded.

The traditional caipirinha is perfection, but there are many ways to make variations on the classic with an array of different fruits. We have those options for you below.

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The Plum Recipes That’ll Make You Fall In Love With This Stone Fruit

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It’s easy to forget about plums. They’re not the most popular of summer fruits. Plums aren’t small and cute like blueberries. They’re not as exotic as the fig. Plums are just plums. And so in the frenzy of stocking up on summer’s bounty, it’s easy to overlook this humble fruit. But that’s a big mistake

We think plums are pretty great — they’re perfectly sweet and tart, not too big and not too small. They make killer cakes, jams and tarts; as well as a great wine popsicle, too.

To make sure you don’t pass up on plums this season, we rounded up the best recipes around.

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Now You’re Cooking – Strawberry Granita

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One out of eight films created for Electrolux’ ‘Now You’re Cooking’ campaign.
Direction: Victor Köhler & Albin Holmqvist
D.O.P: Hannes Isaksson
Producer: Amanda Nordlöw
Food Stylist: Cilla Göthlinder
Typography & Art Direction: Albin Holmqvist
Agency: House of Radon
Campaignsite: Nowyourecooking.tumblr.com

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40 Truly Amazing Blueberry Recipes YUM!

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We have blueberries to thank for some of our favorite foods. What would mornings be without them? We wouldn’t have blueberry muffins — the only truly great muffins out there — pancakes would be fruitless, and pie just wouldn’t be as awesome (because yes, you can eat pie for breakfast). For such a tiny fruit, blueberries make some truly spectacular dishes.

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Since summer is short, and blueberry season fleeting, we recommend getting your fill of the blueberry while you can. Actually, we think you should add them to everything — and we’ve shown you how to do just that with the recipes below.

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How to make sushi

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Points to remember

Rinse the sushi rice in cold water until the water runs clear, then soak roughly two parts rice to three parts cold water in a saucepan for 30 minutes.
Next, bring the rice to the boil, cover and cook for 10 minutes or until the rice has absorbed all the water and is tender. Check the packet instructions for exact timings.
Stir through the rice vinegar and sugar.
Cool the rice down as quickly as you can by spreading it onto a baking tray and covering with a slightly damp tea towel.
Place a nori sheet on top of your sushi rolling mat.
Dampen your hands to prevent sticking, then pick up a handful of rice and spread evenly on your nori sheet, leaving the top third uncovered.
Place a thin row of filling ingredients across the middle of the rice.
Hold the near edge of the mat, lift and roll away from you, encasing the filling. Ensure the ingredients stay in place and the rice sticks.
Dampen the top boarder with a little water to seal. Wrap tightly in cling film and chill until firm.
Brush your knife with rice vinegar to prevent sticking and cut the roll into neat rounds.
Serve with pickled ginger and a dollop of wasabi.

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How to crimp a pie

Points to remember

Cover the top of your pie with pastry. Pick up the pie in one hand and use a small sharp knife in the other to trim away excess pastry.
For a really simple neat finish, use the tines of a fork, pressing them all the way around the rim of the pie dish.
For a classic crimp, use one finger to push the pastry down towards the outside of the dish. Pinch around that finger with the finger and thumb of your other hand to create a scalloped effect.
Make a ‘wave’ pattern, by pushing your two slightly spaced forefingers fingers into the pastry at an angle, all the way around the edge of your pastry.
For a more unusual finish that works well with puff pastry, cut a fringe with a knife around the edge of the pie on the rim of the dish. Fold over alternate strips of pastry to give you two concentric circles.
Brush the pastry with beaten egg yolk, make a small steam hole in the centre and cook in a preheated oven.

14 Clever Cooking Hacks You Need to Try

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Anyone who’s striving to follow a healthier diet should start by prepping more meals at home. Cooking your own food allows you to control portion sizes and ingredients used, not to mention it saves you money. But there is a learning curve when it comes to all that chopping, slicing, and dicing. That’s why we’ve collected 14 clever tips and tricks for cooking at home from our friends at Food & Wine—no fancy gadgets or chef-worthy knife skills required.

 

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The Basil Recipes That Define Summer

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Basil is summer’s defining herb. In many parts of the Western world, the blossoming of this herb coincides with many of the season’s other darlings, like tomatoes and peaches. Naturally, the herb ― which is a member of the mint family ― is a perfect complement and can be found paired together in many dishes.

It is believed that basil first had its start in Asia and Africa ― but it quickly took off all over the world. While basil is available in over 60 varieties, the most popular kind is sweet Italian basil, known as Sweet Genovese. With big, soft leaves, it just begs to be served on top of pasta. Thai basil (which has smaller, pointed leaves) and purple opal basil (which is … purple) are also common these days.

Whichever kind you get your hands on, try them in a few of the recipes below.

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